Publications, Organized by Country

Below is a list of The Advocates for Human Rights' publications. Those publications marked with an asterisk indicate submissions to the United Nations and regional  human rights bodies. To access these submissions, you may also find them by clicking here.

The following list includes publications and submissions for Albania, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Bulgaria, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Croatia, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Ethiopia, Georgia, Ghana, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, India, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Japan, Kenya, KoreaKosovo, Liberia, Libya, Macedonia, Malawi, Malaysia, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia, Morocco, Nepal, Philippines, Poland, Romania, Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, Tajikistan, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United States, Uzbekistan

Albania
1. Domestic Violence in Albania (1996)
Documents domestic violence as a human rights violation in Albania. The report proivides an historical background on Albania and examines evidence of domestic violence in that country. The report also analyzes relevant Albanian laws and their implementation, and compares these laws to Albania's obligations under international law. This is one part of a series on domestic violence in the Balkans.  ISBN: 0-929293 34-7

2. Press Restrictions in Albania  (1995)
Documents and calls for an end to the legislative developments limiting press freedom in Albania, the repression measures taken against some journalists, and the government's apparent attempt to assert economic control over the print media. ISBN:0-929293 29-0

3. Trimming the Cats Claws: Politics of Impurity in Albania (1992)
Details an investigation of the protection of human rights in the Albanian legal system in light of the dramatic political changes in the country in 1990 and 1991. 

4. Albania: Violations of the Right to Freedom of Thought, Conscience, and Religion (1988)

Armenia
1. Domestic Violence in Armenia (2000)
Documents domestic violence as a human rights violation in Armenia. The report analyzes the Armenian legal system, including criminal law, administrative law and family law as well as forensic regulations that relate to domestic violence. The report includes information on both the police and NGO response to domestic violence. The report also addresses Armenia's obligations under international law. ISBN 0-929293 45-2

Bulgaria
1. *Human Rights Council - Domestic Violence - Sept. 2014
Since the first UN Human Rights Council Universal Periodic Review in 2010, the Bulgarian government has regularly conducted public awareness campaigns on gender-based violence, but it remains widespread. This report makes recommendations for further progress, including amendments to Bulgaria’s Criminal Code and its civil law, Protection against Domestic Violence. Collaborators: The Bulgarian Gender Research Foundation and The Alliance for Protection against Domestic Violence. For background information, click here.

2. *Human Rights Committee - Women's Human Rights - July 2011
The Advocates and the Bulgarian Gender Research Foundation (BGRF) have worked in partnership since 1994, publishing reports on domestic violence in Bulgaria, training court monitors, consulting on the 2005 domestic violence law, and training police and judges on effective implementation of the new law. This report documents Bulgaria’s progress in addressing domestic violence. Collaborator: BGRF. For background information, click here.

3. *UPR 9th Session - Women's Human Rights - 2010
This submission addresses Bulgaria’s compliance with its human rights obligations in the context of domestic violence. For background information, click here.

4. Implementation of the the Bulgarian Law on Protection against Domestic Violence: A Human Rights Report (March 2008)
On March 16, 2005, Bulgaria passed a new law to combat domestic violence. Since that time, thousands of victims of domestic violence have come forward to use the law to obtain protection against their abusers. In 2006 alone, more than 2,000 cases of domestic violence under the new law were brought before the courts, resulting in 800 orders for protection. Throughout 2007, the Advocates and Bulgarian Gender Research Foundation conducted human rights monitoring to investigate implementation of the law by all principals, including the state, police, judges, prosecutors, media and NGOs. This report presents the findings and makes recommendations to improve implementation of the law. Co-authored by The Advocates for Human Rights and the Bulgarian Gender Research Foundation, this report was produced with the support of the Oak Foundation and UNIFEM. ISBN: 0-929293-59-2

5. Sex Discrimination and Sexual Harassment in the Workplace in Bulgaria (1999)
Documents sex discrimination and sexual harassment in the workplace as human rights violations. The report analyzes the legal system of Bulgaria, including labor and employment laws, as well as the government's enforcement of these laws. The report includes information on trade union and employer responses to sex discrimination and sexual harassment and addresses Bulgaria's obligations under domestic and international law. ISBN: 0-929293 42-8

6. Domestic Violence in Bulgaria  (1996)
Documents domestic violence as a human rights violation in Bulgaria, and analyzes the legal system in Bulgaria, including criminal laws, police response to domestic violence, administrative procedures and divorce laws. The report also addresses Bulgaria's obligations under international law. This report is part of a series on domestic violence in the Balkans. ISBN: 0-929293 33-9

Cameroon
1. *CEDAW - Violence against Women - Feb. 2014
Violence against women remains a widespread problem in Cameroon, contrary to the Cameroonian government’s assent to two international charters and a convention on the issue. For background information, click here.

2. *CEDAW - Political Participation of Women - Feb. 2014
By ratifying the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women in 1994, Cameroon agreed under Articles 7 and 8 to take measures to eliminate discrimination against women in political and public life, including equal voting rights and equal representation in all levels of government. However, barriers to women’s political participation in Cameroon remain significant. For background information, click here.

3. *CEDAW - Women's Education in Cameroon - Feb. 2014
By ratifying the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women in 1994, Cameroon agreed under Article 10 to ensure equal rights for women in education. Despite legislative enactment of this international commitment, girls in Cameroon do not receive equal access to education. For background information, click here.

4. *Human Rights Council - Death Penalty - Sept. 2012
The potential resumption of the death penalty in Cameroon poses a serious threat to the human rights of the accused and to prisoners on death row, a threat exacerbated by Cameroon’s underfunded and disorganized criminal justice system. This submission describes how Cameroon’s death penalty violates international human rights standards and identifies ways to address those violations. Collaborators: Droits et Paix and La Ligue Camerounaise des Droits Humains

5. *African Commission - Women's Rights - Oct. 2013
This report addresses four forms of violence against women in Cameroon – rape, domestic violence, breast ironing and, female genital mutilation (FGM) – as well as the issue of women’s access to employment. The report demonstrates that Cameroon does not do enough to protect and promote the rights of women. Collaborator: Ecumenical Service for Peace. For background information, click here.

6. *African Commission - Death Penalty and Detention Conditions - Oct. 2013
This report shows that despite a de facto moratorium on the death penalty, Cameroon continues to sentence people to death and retains the possibility of carrying out these sentences. The report also describes serious human rights violations in the country’s detention facilities. Collaborator: Droits et Paix. For background information, click here.

7. *African Commission - LGBTI Rights - Oct. 2013
This report describes the widespread persecution of and discrimination against people on the basis of perceived and actual sexual orientation and gender identity in Cameroon. Collaborators: the Cameroonian Foundation for AIDS, Le Réseau des Défenseurs des Droits Humains en Afrique Centrale, and L’Association pour la Défense des Droits des Homosexuels. For background information, click here.

8. *Human Rights Council - Death Penalty - Sept. 2012
For background information, click here.

Central African Republic
1. *Human Rights Council - Death Penalty - Oct. 2013
The Central African Republic (CAR) supported the 2012 UN General Assembly resolution calling for a moratorium on the death penalty, but nonetheless continued arbitrary and prolonged detentions with the threat of torture or execution. This report recommends that the CAR abolish the death penalty de jure and address related human rights violations. The Advocates submitted this stakeholder report to the UN Human Rights Council for its October 2013 Universal Periodic Review of the CAR. Collaborator: World Coalition Against the Death Penalty. For background information, click here.

Croatia

1. Implementation of Croatia's Domestic Violence Legislation: Follow-Up Report - March 2016
The report sets forth findings made in 2014 during a monitoring mission conducted by The Advocates for Human Rights and Autonomous Women’s House Zagreb. It highlights findings on the implementation of the LPDV, the state’s response to violations of protective measures, victim services and shelters, problems with the new Family Law for victims of domestic violence, challenges in prosecution and promoting victim safety through the criminal justice system, and inter‐agency cooperation.

2. *Human Rights Committee - Domestic Violence - Feb. 2015

3. *Committee against Torture - Domestic Violence - Oct. 2014
The Croatian government's failure to hold perpetrators of domestic violence accountable and protect victims constitutes a breach of its Convention against Torture obligations. The report identifies weaknesses in the drafting and implementation of Croatia’s domestic violence laws, and offers recommendations for improvement. Collaborator: Autonomous Women's House Zagreb

4. *Human Rights Council - Domestic Violence - Sept. 2013
Violence against women continues to be widespread in Croatia, even though Croatia has enacted several domestic violence laws since its first UN Human Rights Council Universal Periodic Review (UPR) in 2010. This report highlights the key challenges that remain, both in law and in practice, and provides recom-mendations for the Croatian government. Collaborator: Autonomous Women’s House Zagreb. For background information, click here.

Domestic violence is a serious problem in Croatia. Croatia passed a domestic violence law in 2003, later amended in 2009, which provides protective measures to victims of domestic violence. In October 2010 and February 2011, The Advocates for Human Rights, in collaboration with its partners, the Bulgarian Gender Research Foundation and Autonomous Women’s House Zagreb, sent delegations to Croatia to investigate the implementation of Croatia’s domestic violence legislation. The delegations conducted interviews with NGOs, shelter workers, police, judges, Centers for Social Welfare personnel, ministry officials, health care workers, victims, prison personnel, and other government representatives. This report presents the delegations’ findings, and makes recommendations to strengthen the government’s implementation of domestic violence laws to better protect victims and hold offenders accountable.
ISBN: 0-929293-70-3
 
The Government of Croatia has taken some steps to curb domestic violence, but certain aspects of the legislation, enforcement, and support structures remain ineffective. The Advocates identified questions pertaining to domestic violence that the Committee should pose during its review of Croatia’s compliance with the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. Collaborator: Autonomous Women’s House Zagreb. 
 
Democratic People's Republic of Korea
1. Human Rights in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (1988)
Download First PartSecond PartAppendices
Examines the DPRK government's established comprehensive system which consistently deprives its citizens of basic human rights and fundamental freedoms. Continued monitoring is called for, and recommendations are given to the DPRK government and to international organizations to engage DPRK in compliance with the human rights instruments it has bound itself to. ISBN: 0-929293- 03-7
 
The Ethiopian government has actively infringed upon the civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights of its citizens, in violation of the African Charter on Human and Peoples' Rights. The treatment of disadvantaged ethnic groups, including the Oromo, is of particular concern. Collaborator: International Oromo Youth Association. For background information, click here.

2. *Committee on the Rights of the Child - Children's Rights - July 2014
This report identifies numerous violations of the rights of children in Ethiopia. In some cases, children belonging to the Oromo ethnic group face discrimination or other rights violations unique to their ethnicity. Collaborator: International Oromo Youth Association. For background information, click here.

3. Human Rights Council - Ethnic Discrimination - May 2014
This report documents the government of Ethiopia’s failure to meet its international human rights obligations, particularly with respect to the rights to equality, life, liberty, security, privacy, and freedom of expression and association. Ethnic groups such as the Oromo and the Annuak, among others, suffer the greatest consequences. 

4. *Human Rights Council - Ethnic Discrimination - Sept. 2013 For background information, click here.

5. *Human Rights Council - Rights of Non-citizens - Oct. 2012 For background information, click here.

6. *Ethiopia - ICESCR - Ethnic Diversity - March 2012
This report is based on interviews with members of the Ethiopian diaspora and professionals who work with them, as well as reviews of news and human rights reports. It highlights ongoing human rights violations perpetrated against members of the Oromo, Anuak, and other ethnic groups in Ethiopia, including forced displacement; discrimination in work and education; and preventing access to food, water, and health care. For background information, click here.

7. *Human Rights Council Human Rights - Violations of Minorities – July 2011
This submission highlights ongoing violations of the human rights of members of the Oromo ethnic group in Ethiopia, including arbitrary arrest, detention, and torture. Other concerns include discrimination and violations of the freedoms of expression and peaceful assembly. 

8. *UPR 6th Session - Human Rights Violations against Minorities - 2009
This submission outlines grave concerns about the government of Ethiopia’s continued violation of the human rights of the Oromo people, as reported by Ethiopian nationals living in the United States, and by news media and human rights organizations monitoring conditions in Ethiopia. For background information, click here.

9. Human Rights in Ethiopia: Through the Eyes of the Oromo Diaspora  [Download Report in Black & White] (2009)
Highlights a continuing and pervasive pattern of human rights violations in Ethiopia based on documentation from Oromos in the diaspora.

Georgia
1. Domestic Violence and Child Abuse in Georgia:  An Assessment of Current Standings of Law and Practice Regarding Domestic Abuse and Child Abuse in Georgia, and Recommendations for Future United Nations Country Team Involvement (December 2006)
Co-authored by The Advocates for Human Rights and the Institute for Policy Studies in Georgia, the report has been published in English and Georgian by the United Nations Country Team in Georgia. It combines a review of current research on the topic with interviews of legal, medical and social service professionals to assess the problems of domestic violence and child abuse in Georgia, and the response of governmental agencies, international institutions and social service agencies to these complex issues. The report includes specific recommendations to relevant agencies in Georgia and a commentary on Georgia’s domestic violence law. ISBN: 99928-0-821-7

Ghana
1. *Human Rights Council - Rights of Non-citizens - April 2012
During the Human Rights Council’s first review in 2008, Ghana rejected a recommendation to continue promoting human rights standards and fighting discrimination against vulnerable groups, including immigrants. The Advocates' report focuses on human rights developments concerning Liberians currently registered in the Buduburam refugee settlement in Ghana, all of whom were threatened with losing their refugee status. For background information, click here.

2. *African Commission - Liberian Refugees - 2009
This report addresses the situation of Liberian refugees living in Ghana. Of particular concern was the Ghanaian government’s reaction to protests that took place on the Liberian refugee settlement in February and March 2008. For background information, click here.

Guatemala
1. Justice Suspended: the Failure of the Habeas Corpus System in Guatemala (1990)
Documents the ineffectiveness of Guatemala's Habeas Corpus system in the government's failure to investigate crimes of political killings, kidnappings, and disappearances and for failing to put an end to the extra-legal activity of the armed groups that perpetuate these crimes. Recommendations are given for improving the Habeas Corpus procedure. ISBN: 0-929293 08-8

Haiti
1. Another Violence Against Women: The Lack of Accountability in Haiti (1995) 
Executive summary online only. Documents the systematic rape of women as a tool of repression in Haiti during the military rule from 1991-1994 and evaluates the mechanisms established by the Haitian government to address this violence. 

2. RESTAVEK: Child Domestic Labor in Haiti (1989)
Details the common practice of domestic child labor in Haiti, known in Creole as "restavek," and illuminates the plight of restavek children who lack basic economic and civil rights. Recommendations, directed toward the abolition of restavek, are provided. ISBN: 0-929293 06-1

Honduras
1. *Human Rights Council - Violence against Women - Sept. 2014
Violence against women in Honduras – including gun violence, domestic violence, sexual violence and femicide – is widespread, systematic and increasing at a dramatic rate. Collaborators: International Action Network on Small Arms and Comité de América Latina y el Caribe para la Defensa de los Derechos de las Mujeres–Honduras. For background information, click here.

India
1. *Human Rights Council - Human Rights Violations of Minorities - Sept. 2012
This submission addresses India’s failure to comply with its international human rights obligations to protect members of minority groups. In particular, the submission calls attention to serious problems with the treatment of Muslims in India. Collaborators: the Indian American Muslim Council and Jamia Teachers Solidarity Association. For background information, click here.

Iran
1. *Human Rights Council - Death Penalty - Oct. / Nov. 2014
This submission describes Iran’s international human rights obligations with regard to its use of the death penalty. Concerns include the large number of death-eligible offenses and the execution of juveniles. Collaborators: The Abdorrahman Boroumand Foundation, Iran Human Rights, the Association for Human Rights in Kurdistan of Iran - Geneva, and the World Coalition Against the Death Penalty. For background information, click here.

2. *Human Rights Committee - ICCPR - Death Penalty - 2011
This shadow report shows how Iran’s execution methods, death row prison conditions, and failure to notify families of impending executions violate the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. Collaborator: World Coalition Against the Death Penalty. For background information, click here.

Iraq
1. *Human Rights Council - Death Penalty - October/November 2014
This submission describes Iraq’s international human rights obligations with regard to its use of the death penalty. Concerns include the dramatic increase in its use of the death penalty and the lack of fairness and transparency in its judicial processes. Collaborators: the World Coalition Against the Death Penalty and the Iraqi Coalition Against the Death Penalty. For background information, click here.

Jamaica
1. *Human Rights Committee - ICCPR - Death Penalty - 2011
This shadow report shows how conditions on Jamaica’s death row, including overcrowding, unsanitary conditions, and inadequate medical treatment, violate the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights prohibition on inhumane and degrading treatment. This report is particularly important in light of a 2011 Jamaican Constitutional amendment curtailing death row inmates’ rights to review of their conditions by external bodies. Collaborator: World Coalition Against the Death Penalty. For background information, click here.

Japan
1. *Human Rights Committee – Prison Conditions and Death Penalty - July 2014
This report examines prison conditions and the imposition of the death penalty in Japan in light of international human rights standards. Collaborators: Center for Prisoners’ Rights Japan, International Federation for Human Rights, and the World Coalition against the Death Penalty. For background information, click here.

2. *Human Rights Council - Death Penalty - Oct. 2012
The joint stakeholder report addresses Japan’s human rights obligations regarding the death penalty and treatment of prisoners on death row. Japan has rebuffed recommendations from many countries to abolish the death penalty, and furthermore, has failed to implement other measures to protect the human rights of those facing possible execution. Collaborator: World Coalition against the Death Penalty. For background information, click here.

Kenya
1. Engaging Minorities and Indigenous Communities in the Kenya TJRC (2010)
This briefing note focuses on recommendations for how the newly formed Kenya Truth, Justice and Reconciliation Commission (TJRC) can ensure that Kenya’s many minority and indigenous peoples, such as the Maasai, the Nubians, the Ogiek, the Endorois, and many other groups can be active participants in the truth commission process in Kenya.

 Korea
1. Human Rights in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (1988)
Examines the DPRK government's established comprehensive system which consistently deprives its citizens of basic human rights and fundamental freedoms. Continued monitoring is called for and recommendations are given to the DPRK government and to international organizations to engage DPRK in compliance with the human rights instruments it has bound itself to. ISBN: 0-929293-03-7

Kosovo
1. The Minnesota Plan: Recommendations for Preventing Gross Human Rights Violations in Kosovo (1993) 
Details the severe repression of ethnic Albanians in Kosovo and gives recommendations for the international community to prevent an escalation of conflict and further abuses of human rights in this region of the former Yugoslavia.

Liberia
1. *Human Rights Council - Pretrial Detention - Sept. 2014
An estimated 83% of all prisoners in Liberia are in pretrial detention, which can last up to four years. The problem of prolonged pretrial detention is magnified by prison conditions that violate basic human rights. Collaborators: The Liberia Law Society, Inc. and Liberia Prison Watch, Inc. For background information, click here.

2. *UPR 9th Session - Accountability - November 2010
From 1979 until 2003, the Liberian people endured a coup d’etat, military rule, and two civil wars. The Liberian Truth and Reconciliation Commission (LTRC) was established to promote peace, security, unity and reconciliation, and to hold human rights violators accountable. The Advocates coordinated the LTRC’s work with the Liberian diaspora, and presented these recommendations on accountability. For background information, click here.

3. *CEDAW - 44th Session - July 2009
This report provided information and recommendations on the treatment of women in Liberia to assist in reviewing Liberia’s compliance with the Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women. For background information, click here.

4. A House with Two Rooms (2009)
A House with Two Rooms documents the experience of human rights abuses and violations of international humanitarian law that forced Liberians to leave the country. It is based on an analysis of more than 1,600 statements, fact-finding interviews, and witness testimony at public hearings held in the U.S. The report also tells the story of the “triple trauma” experienced by members of the diaspora during their flight through Liberia and across international borders, while living in refugee camps in West Africa, and in resettlement in the U.S. and U.K. In addition, the report summarizes the views of Liberians in the diaspora on the root causes of the conflict and their recommendations for systemic reform and reconciliation. ISBN: 978-1449508876
Cost to order: $25.99; to order from Amazon and receive free shipping, click here.

5. Liberia is Not Ready 2010
Highlights reasons the United States government should extend Deferred Enforced Departure (DED) for Liberians, which expired on March 31, 2010. The report argues that conditions in Liberia make forced return a dangerous and ill-advised option. Instead, the report recommends that the U.S. government act immediately to ensure Liberians are not deported.

Libya
1. *Human Rights Council - Women's Rights - Sept. 2014
Serious violations of women’s rights occurred in Libya during the regime of Muammar Qaddafi, the 2011 revolution, and the post-revolution transition. Women in Libya continue to face serious human rights violations in the forms of sexual and gender-based violence; discrimination in personal status; and discrimination in the political, economic and social fields. Collaborator: Mobilising for Rights Associates. For background information, click here.

Macedonia
1. Domestic Violence in Macedonia (1998)
Documents domestic violence as a human rights violation in Macedonia. The report analyzes the legal system of Macedonia, including criminal law and family law as well as forensic regulations that relate to domestic violence. The report includes information on both the police and NGO response to domestic violence. The report also addresses Macedonia's obligations under international law. ISBN: 0-929293 40-1

Malawi
1. *Human Rights Council - Death Penalty - Sept. 2014
This report recommends that Malawi abolish the death penalty in non-homicide cases in favor of a fair, proportionate sentence that respects international human rights standards, or alternatively, abolish the death penalty completely. It also recommends that Malawi provide universal access to adequate legal representation and improve prison conditions. Collaborator: World Coalition Against the Death Penalty. For background information, click here.

2. *African Commission on Human and Peoples' Rights - Death Penalty - Sept. 2014
This report describes how Malawi fails to meet its obligations under the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights as they pertain to the death penalty, pretrial detention, adequate legal resources, and prison conditions. For background information, click here.

Malaysia
1. *Human Rights Council – Death Penalty – Oct. 2013
Malaysia’s imposition of the death penalty violates international human rights standards, a problem that is exacerbated by subjecting prisoners to cruel and inhumane conditions on death row, allowing the death penalty for ordinary crimes, and requiring the death penalty for other crimes. The report documents these violations and recommends remedies. The Advocates submitted this stakeholder report to the UN Human Rights Council for its Universal Periodic Review of Malaysia. Collaborator: Harm Reduction International. For background information, click here.

Mexico
1. Full Rights, Whole Children: A Case Study of Child Survival and Human Rights in Mexico (2001)
Documents violations of children's economic, social and cultural rights in Mexico. This report supplements The Advocates' 1998 case-study on Child Mortality inMexico. The new report includes an analysis of Mexico's macroeconomic polices, the Mexican health care system and government social welfare programs that impact child well-being. ISBN: 0-929293 50-7

2. Global Child Survival: A Human Rights Priority: Case Studies of Uganda, Mexico, and U.S. (1999)
In developing and developed countries alike, more than 12 million children under the age of five die each year as a result of inadequate health services, violence, malnutrition, unsafe water, and lack of other basic necessities.  These deaths constitute an unspeakable tragedy and must be recognized as a gross violation of fundamental human rights.  This report tackles the serious issue of preventable child mortality and emphasizes that all rights -- civil, political, economic, social and cultural -- must be promoted and protected in order to ensure the health and survival of children. ISBN: 0-929293 38-x. Out of print

3. The Rule of Lawlessness in Mexico: Human Rights Violations in the State of Oaxaca  (1996)
Documents an array of human rights violations resulting from government act and omission in the state of OaxacaMexico, and gives recommendations to the Oaxacan state government and the Mexican federal government. Produced in conjunction with the Heartland Alliance for Human Needs and Human Rights. ISBN: 0-929293 36-3

4. Derechos Humanos Y Poder Judicial En Mexico (1995)
Reviews the structure and practice of the judicial branch of government in Mexico as it affects the human rights of Mexican citizens. Analyzes structural and practical impediments to the independence of the judiciary, including the procedures for appointment and discipline of judges, and the use of judicial power as an instrument of executive authority. Spanish only. ISBN: 0-929293 27-4

5. Massacre in Mexico: Killings and Cover-up in the State of Guerrero (1995)
Describes the state police killing of seventeen civilians and the lengths to which the Guerrero state government sought to cover up these killings. The report also analyzes the failed federal government response to the massacre in light of its international human rights responsibilities. ISBN: 0-929293 30-4

6. Codificando Represion: El Codigo Penal para el Estado de Chiapas (1994)
Analyzes the Penal Code of the state of Chiapas and recommends fundamental changes in the document so that the legal standards that govern the state conform to international principles of human rights ratified by Mexico. Spanish only. ISBN: 0-929293 24-x

7. Harassment of Human Rights Defenders in Mexico (1994)
Details escalating aggressions against human rights advocates, community workers and the Catholic Church prior to the national elections of August 1994, and urges the Mexican government to guarantee international human rights protections for these individuals and their organizations. ISBN: 0-929293 20-7

8. Reflexiones Sobre Democracia y Derechos Humanos (1994)
Presents various reflections about the relationship between democracy and human rights, discussing the various interpretations of these two concepts. The relationship and conclusions are discussed within the context of Mexican society and politics. No ISBN

9. Stifling Human Rights Advocacy in Mexico: The Censure of Brigadier General Jose' Francisco (1994)
Gallardo Rodriguez Highlights the risks facing human rights advocates in Mexico today by detailing the case of a prominent Mexican general who was jailed after denouncing military human rights violations. ISBN: 0-929293 19-3

10. The Mexican Coordination of National Public Security (1994)
Analyzes the creation and potential impact on human rights protections of a new Mexican executive office with broad authority over the nation's security forces. ISBN: 0-929293 22-3 

11. Civilians at Risk: Military and Police Abuses in Mexican Countryside  (1993)
Documents patterns of human rights abuses by the Mexico military and police against indigenous communities in rural Mexico. ISBN: 0-929293 16-9

12. Conquest Continued: Disregard for Human and Indigenous Rights in the Mexican State of Chiapas (1992)
Details the intimidation, torture, and electoral fraud used by Mexico's police and ruling political party to exclude the indigenous population from political participation and economic progress in Chiapas. ISBN: 0-929293 13-4

13. No Double Standards in International Law: Linkage of NAFTA with Hemispheric System of Human Rights (1992)
Calls for the linkage of the NAFTA agreement with international human rights enforcement mechanisms. ISBN: 0-929293 15-0

14. The Homicide of Dr. Victor Manuel Oropeza Contreras: A Case Study of Failed Human Rights Reforms in Mexico (1991)
Examines the homicide of a popular, outspoken newspaper columnist. The investigation of this death exemplified the abuses and failings of the Mexican police and prosecuting authorities. ISBN: 0-929293 11-8

15. Paper Protection: Human Rights Violations and the Mexican Criminal Justice System . (1990)
Documents chronic human rights abuses by the Mexican police forces and analyzes the relevant Mexican and international legal provisions. ISBN: 0-929293 07-x

Moldova
1. Implementation of the Republic of Moldova's Domestic Violence Legislation: A Human Rights Report (November 2012)
Domestic violence, a serious problem in Moldova, violates fundamental human rights to safety and security and the rights to be free from torture and violence. In July 2010, Moldova became one of the first countries in the region to address domestic violence with specific legislation in both the civil and criminal systems. In November 2011, The Advocates for Human Rights, in collaboration with its partner, the Bulgarian Gender Research Foundation, sent a delegation to Moldova to investigate the implementation of Moldova’s domestic violence legislation. The delegation, with the support of the Moldovan Women’s Law Center conducted interviews throughout the country with police, prosecutors, judges, government ministry officials, NGOs, shelters, maternal centers, victims, child protection services employees, United Nations organizations, prison officials, academics, journalists, health care professionals, and lawyers. This report presents the delegation’s findings and makes recommendations to strengthen the government’s response to better protect victims of domestic violence and hold offenders accountable. ISBN: 0-929293-71-1

2. Domestic Violence in Moldova (2000)
Documents domestic violence as a human rights violation in Moldova. The report analyzes the legal system of Moldova, including criminal law and family law as well as forensic regulations that relate to domestic violence. The report includes information on both the police and NGO response to domestic violence. The report also addresses Moldova's obligations under international law. ISBN: 0-929293 46-0

3. Trafficking in Women: Moldova and Ukraine (2000)
Documents the trafficking of women for the commercial sex industry as a human rights violation in both Moldova and Ukraine. The report analyzes the mechanisms of trafficking in both countries and the NGO and governmental response to the problem, including information on Moldovan and Ukrainian law. The report also addresses the obligations of the Moldovan and Ukrainian government under international law. ISBN: 0-929293 46-0

Mongolia
1. Implementation of Mongolia’s Domestic Violence Legislation (January 2014)
Domestic violence is a serious problem in Mongolia, where it was estimated that one in three women was a victim of domestic violence in 2010, according to an estimate by the National Center Against Violence (NCAV), headquartered in Ulaanbaater, Mongolia. Developed by The Advocates and its partner, the NCAV, this report analyzes the real-life results that followed the Mongolian government’s enactment of the Law to Combat Domestic Violence (LCDV) in 2004. The Advocates and NCAV led two fact-finding missions in January and March 2013, traveling to seven cities in Mongolia and conducting 137 interviews, including with ministry officials, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), victims, social workers, police, judges, prosecutors, lawyers, governors, and health care workers. In January 2014 the report was presented to Mongolian parliamentarians, Ministry of Justice officials, prosecutors, judges, and the U.S. ambassador to Mongolia and embassy personnel. This report presents the findings of extensive research and makes recommendations to strengthen the government’s domestic violence laws to better protect victims and hold offenders accountable. Specifically the report points to challenges obtaining restraining orders; the consequences of domestic violence not being directly addressed by penal legislation; the barriers the country’s Family Law poses to obtaining a divorce; and the results of the lack of shelters and essential social services and support. ISBN: 0-929293-73-8

Morocco

1. *Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights ― Women's Rights ― January 2015

2. *Human Rights Council - Women's Rights - June 2014 (English) (Arabic)
This report assesses Morocco’s implementation to date of recommendations on women’s rights that it accepted at the UN Human Rights Council’s first Universal Periodic Review in 2010. The three categories of recommendations that Morocco accepted were violence against women; abrogation of provisions that allowed rapists to escape punishment by marrying their victims and adoption of measures to ensure their punishment; and modification of existing legislation to ensure gender equality. Collaborator: Mobilising for Rights Associates. For background information, click here.

3. *Committee on the Rights of the Child (List of Issues) - Child Domestic Workers - Dec. 2013
While the Moroccan government has made commendable efforts to reduce child labor, thousands of young girls continue to suffer as petites bonnes ("little maids," or child domestic workers). This report identified questions the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child should pose during its review of Morocco’s compliance with the Convention on the Rights of the Child. For background information, click here.

4. *Committee on the Rights of the Child (List of Issues) - Article 475 - Dec. 2013
Article 475 of the Moroccan Penal Code provides that someone who "abducts or deceives" a minor can escape criminal prosecution if the abductor marries the victim. Reports from Morocco indicate that Article 475 has been applied in cases of sexual abuse of minors. This report recommends further investigation into these issues in light of Morocco’s obligations under the Convention on the Rights of the Child. Collaborator: Mobilising for Rights Associates. For background information, click here.

5. *Human Rights Council - Violence against Women - May 2012
The report focuses on Morocco’s compliance with its treaty obligations as they relate to violence against women. The report found that domestic violence is a widespread problem in Morocco that requires immediate attention. The Government of Morocco has not fulfilled its treaty obligations to prevent domestic violence, protect victims, and hold perpetrators accountable. Collaborator: Global Rights. For background information, click here.

6. *Human Rights Coucil - Death Penalty - Sept. 2011
The report focuses on the death penalty and living conditions of death row inmates in Morocco. Collaborator: World Coalition Against the Death Penalty

7. *Committee Against Torture - Final Shadow Report - Violence against Women - October 2011; Challenges with addressing domestic violence in compliance with the Convention Against Torture; Joint Submission - Violence against Women; Final Shadow Report in Arabic; Final Shadow Report in French
This report finds that domestic violence is a widespread problem in Morocco that requires immediate attention. The Moroccan government has not fulfilled its obligations under the Convention Against Torture to prevent domestic violence, protect victims, and hold perpetrators accountable. Collaborator: Global Rights. For background information, click here.

8. *Committee Against Torture - Death Penalty - 2011
This shadow report focuses on the death penalty and living conditions of death row inmates in Morocco, in light of Morocco’s obligations under the Convention Against Torture. Collaborator: World Coalition Against the Death Penalty.
For background information, click here.

Nepal
1. Domestic Violence in Nepal (1998)
Documents domestic violence as a human rights violation in Nepal. The report analyzes the legal system of Nepal, including the criminal law and family law provisions that relate to domestic violence. The report includes information on both the police and NGO response to domestic violence. The report also addresses Nepal's obligations under international law. ISBN: 0-929293 41-x

Philippines
1. The Philippines: A Human Rights Scrapbook (1989)

Poland
1. Domestic Violence in Poland (2002)
Documents domestic violence as a human rights violation in Poland. The report analyzes the response of both the criminal justice system and civil law to the problem of domestic violence. The report includes information about recently-implemented police programs to coordinate the management of domestic violence cases. The report also addresses Poland's obligations under international law, including the criteria for accession into the European Union.

2. Employment Discrimination and Sexual Harassment in Poland (2002)
Documents sex-based discrimination and sexual harassment as human rights violations in Poland. The report analyses Poland's existing constitutional protections and the prohibitions on sex discrimination and sexual harassment found in Polish labor and criminal law. The report also addresses Poland's obligations under international and European law, including the criteria for accession into the European Union. ISBN: 0-929293 53-3

Romania
1. Lifting the Last Curtain: A Report on Domestic Violence in Romania (1995)
Documents domestic violence as a human rights violation in Romania. The report analyzes the legal system of Romania, including criminal law and family law as well as forensic regulations that relate to domestic violence. The report includes information on both the police and NGO response to domestic violence. The report also addresses Romania's obligations under international law. ISBN: 0-929293 26-6 

2. Ioan Ruta - A Case Study of Human Rights in Romania (1988)
Summarizes the MLIHRC's work in the case of Mr. Ioan Constantin Ruta, a Romania citizen presently living in MN, who was detained mysteriously by the Romanian government for four months before being charged with criminal bribery. This report details the conditions of Mr. Ruta's detention, summarizes the events which occurred after his conviction that led to his release and provides an analysis of the legal aspects of Mr. Ruta's arrest, imprisonment, and trial.
ISBN: 0-929293 01-0

Russian Federation
1. *Human Rights Committee - Death Penalty - Feb. 2015

2. *Human Rights Council - Violence against Women - April 2013
In the town of Kushchyovskaya in Russia’s Krasnodar Region, an organized criminal gang called the “Tsapki” orchestrates rapes with impunity, and authorities’ complicity with the gang’s activities forces women to live in fear. The Advocates recommends several measures to protect women from gender-based violence and to hold perpetrators accountable. For background information, click here.

3. *Committee Against Torture - Violence against Women - Nov. 2012
In the town of Kushchyovskaya in Russia’s Krasnodar Region, perpetrators of rape and sexual assault operate with impunity. This report demonstrates that the Russian government’s failure to respond to these crimes violates several articles of the Convention Against Torture. The Advocates recommends several measures to protect women from gender-based violence, punish assailants, and bring Russia into compliance with its obligations under the Convention. For background information, click here.

Saudi Arabia
1. Shame in the House of Saud: Contempt for Human Rights in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (1992)
Documents Saudi Arabia's deplorable human rights record, especially regarding the criminal justice system and the treatment of foreign workers, women and the Shi'a minority. ISBN: 0-929293 12

Tajikistan
1. Domestic Violence in Tajikistan (October 2008)
Domestic violence is a serious problem in Tajikistan. In November 2005 and April 2006, The Advocates for Human Rights sent delegations to Tajikistan to investigate the government and community response to domestic violence. The delegations conducted over one hundred interviews of domestic violence survivors, national and local government representatives, judges, prosecutors, members of the militia, doctors, religious leaders, attorneys, representatives of non-governmental organizations, representatives of international organizations, academics and a journalist.  Once the interviews were completed, The Advocates drafted a human rights report that analyzes the response of both the criminal justice system and civil law to the problem of domestic violence, outlines Tajikistan’s obligations under international law, and includes recommendations for addressing this human rights violation. The Advocates has also compiled an addendum, which provides a two-year update of current conditions and new developments in Tajikistan since the initial draft of the report.  The report is being released in conjunction with The Advocates’ delegation toTajikistan in 2008. ISBN: 978-0-929293-51-6

Tunisia
1. Tunisia: Human Rights Crisis of 1987 (1988)
Reviews the Tunisian government's official position regarding human rights and the human rights situation in Tunisia, including specific reports of human rights violations and the human rights organizations in existence in Tunisia.
ISBN: 0-929293 02-9

Turkey
1. *Human Rights Council - Violence against Women - March 2012
Factors contributing to the high levels of domestic violence in Turkey include confusing and exclusionary laws, delayed and short-lived protection orders, and scarce and excessively selective shelters for victims. The Advocates identified questions intended to guide the Human Rights Committee’s review of Turkey to highlight these issues. 

2. *Human Rights Committee - Gender-based Violence - Feb. 2012
The Advocates interviewed various professionals who serve domestic violence clients in Turkey, then developed a curriculum for Turkish lawyers on effective and sensitive representation of these clients. This submission focuses on Turkey’s order for protection law and on victim-oriented remedies for gender-based violence. Collaborators: the American Bar Association (Istanbul office) and the Law School of Bahçeşehir University. For background information, click here.

Uganda
1. Global Child Survival: A Human Rights Priority: Case Studies of Uganda, Mexico, and U.S. (1999)
In developing and developed countries alike, more than 12 million children under the age of five die each year as a result of inadequate health services, violence, malnutrition, unsafe water, and lack of other basic necessities.  These deaths constitute an unspeakable tragedy and must be recognized as a gross violation of fundamental human rights.  This report tackles the serious issue of preventable child mortality and emphasizes that all rights -- civil, political, economic, social and cultural -- must be promoted and protected in order to ensure the health and survival of children. ISBN: 0-929293 38-x

Ukraine
1. Domestic Violence in Ukraine (2000) 
Documents domestic violence as a human rights violation in Ukraine. The report analyzes the Ukrainian legal system, including criminal law and forensic regulations, family law, housing law and draft legislation on domestic violence. The report includes information on the police response to domestic violence and gives an overview of the services that are available to Ukrainian women. The report also addresses Ukraine's obligations under international law.
ISBN: 0-929293 47-9

2. Trafficking in Women: Moldova and Ukraine  (2000)
Documents the trafficking of women for the commercial sex industry as a human rights violation in both Moldova and Ukraine. The report analyzes the mechanisms of trafficking in both countries and the NGO and governmental response to the problem, including information on Moldovan and Ukrainian law. The report also addresses the obligations of the Moldovan and Ukrainian government under international law. ISBN: 0-929293 49-5

United States
1. *UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination - Rights of Non-citizens - 2015
This report is a follow-up to the 2014 report,  Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination - Rights of Non-citizens, detailing the treatment of immigrants and refugees in Minnesota, as documented in The Advocates' research report, Moving from Exclusion to Belonging: Immigrant Rights in Minnesota Today. Both reports evaluate this treatment in light of the United States' obligations under the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination.

2. *Committee Against Torture - Rights of Non-citizens - Oct. 2014
The United States’ treatment of refugees, asylum-seekers, and other non-citizens violates Article 3 of the Convention against Torture by failing to provide fair hearings focused on a determination of whether there are grounds for asylum or other protection. The United States also violates Article 16 by subjecting non-citizen to cruel and degrading treatment in detention. Collaborator: Detention Watch Network. For background information, click here.

3. *Committee Against Torture - Death Penalty - Oct. 2014
This report highlights concerns that condemned prisoners in the United States are experiencing severe pain and suffering during execution, in violation of the Convention against Torture, due to the use of non-standard lethal injection drugs. The report is endorsed by nine other organizations, including the World Coalition Against the Death Penalty. For background information, click here.

4. *Human Rights Council - Rights of Non-citizens - Sept. 2014
Federal policies, when implemented at the state and local levels, fail to protect the human rights of immigrants and refugees. This stakeholder report is based on The Advocates’ research report Moving from Exclusion to Belonging: Immigrant Rights in Minnesota Today, which incorporated over 200 interviews and 25 community conversations held throughout Minnesota over two years. For background information, click here.

5. *Human Rights Council - Migrant Detention - Sept. 2014
The United States must take several measures to bring its detention of migrants into compliance with its human rights obligations, including repealing mandatory detention laws, providing counsel to all detained migrants, and ending the mandate to fill detention center beds. Collaborator: Detention Watch Network. For background information, click here.

6. *Human Rights Council - Death Penalty - Sept. 2014
Death penalty practices in the United States violate human rights prohibitions on racial and ethnic discrimination, and cruel and inhumane punishment. The practices also violate the constitutional rights to due process and life, liberty, and security of the person. Collaborators: The Greater Caribbean for Life and the Puerto Rican Coalition against the Death Penalty. For background information, click here.

7. *Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination - Death Penalty - July 2014
This report details the United States' international human rights obligations, especially with respect to racial and ethnic minorities, pertaining to the use of the death penalty. Collaborators: The Greater Caribbean for Life and the Puerto Rican Coalition against the Death Penalty. For background information, click here.

8. *Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination - Rights of Non-citizens - July 2014
This report details the treatment of immigrants and refugees in Minnesota, as documented in The Advocates' research report, Moving from Exclusion to Belonging: Immigrant Rights in Minnesota Today. The report evaluates this treatment in light of the United States' obligations under the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination. See 2015 follow-up report.

9. *UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention - Jan. 2014
The United States’ immigration detention system is based on a penal model of corrections that fails to address the needs of a population detained for civil status violations. The reliance on detention reflects broader U.S. trends of racial discrimination, mass incarceration, and criminalization of migration. This report offers recommendations to bring the U.S. immigration detention system into compliance with international human rights standards. Collaborator: Detention Watch Network.

10. *Inter-America Commission on Human Rights - Right to Family Unity
The Advocates submitted this amicus brief in further support of a request for a hearing on the continued widespread violations of family rights and children’s rights protected under the American Declaration. Collaborator: Dechert LLP.
For background information, click here.

11. *United States – Human Rights Committee – Death Penalty – October 2013
This report describes several death penalty practices in the United States that violate the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. These abuses include wrongful conviction, racial bias, cruel and unusual methods of execution, lack of consular notification, and the application of the death penalty to non-triggermen. The Advocates submitted this report to the UN Human Rights Committee its October 2013 review of the United States. Collaborator: Reprieve.

12. *United States – Human Rights Committee – Rights of Non-Citizens – October 2013
The report examines deficiencies in the United States’ compliance with the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights with regard to immigration, such as mandatory detention, inadequate detention facilities, streamlined immigration procedures, and unwarranted detention for asylum seekers. The Advocates submitted the report to the UN Human Rights Committee for its October 2013 review of the United States.

13. *CERD Rights of Immigrants and Migrants – July 2007

14. *Human Rights Committee - Rights of Non-citizens - 2006

15. Moving from Exclusion to Belonging: Immigrant Rights in Minnesota Today (April 2013)
The Advocates for Human Rights’ groundbreaking report centers on the human rights of refugees and immigrants in Minnesota. The report places its findings and recommendations within the context of state, federal, and international human rights law to identify what is working to promote integration and success, what is failing, and what gaps exist in public policy. Tthe report draws on nearly 200 individual interviews and more than 25 community conversations involving hundreds of people throughout the state. ISBN: 0-929293-75-4. To order a print copy, complete an online order form.  Cost: $25

16. Safe Harbor: Fulfilling Minnesota's Promise to Protect Sexually Exploited Youth (Feburary 2013)
In 2011, Minnesota passed the Safe Harbor for Sexually Exploited Youth Act (Safe Harbor 2011), laying the groundwork for a victim-centered response to sexually exploited children and those at risk of sexual exploitation. Safe Harbor 2011 defined prostituted children as the victims of sexual exploitation, ended reliance on delinquency proceedings as the sole systems response to meeting the needs of these crime victims, and called for the creation of a framework for implementation of the changes to the delinquency definition, which become effective on August 1, 2014.

In spite of the strong protections enshrined in the law, Safe Harbor 2011 is limited. Its provisions apply only to children age 15 and under; sex trafficking victims ages 16 and 17 are not protected. Moreover, Safe Harbor 2011 does not provide the mechanisms or the funding to implement the changes to Minnesota’s delinquency code when Safe Harbor goes into effect in 2014. Comprehensive supportive services and housing must be funded and implemented immediately so that they are available when Safe Harbor’s changes to Minnesota’s delinquency definition go into effect in 2014.

This report analyzes Safe Harbor 2011, including the Safe Harbor Working Group process and the comprehensive approach to Safe Harbor which it developed, entitled No Wrong Door: A Comprehensive Approach to Safe Harbor for Minnesota’s Sexually Exploited Youth. In addition, this report examines Safe Harbor 2011 against international standards, federal laws, and emerging state practice related to the sexual exploitation of children to identify gaps that remain. ISBN: 0-929293-72-x

17. *Human Rights Committee - Death Penalty - Oct. 2013
For background information, click here.

18. *Human Rights Committee (List of Issues) - Violence against Women / Immigration and Asylum / Death Penalty - Oct. 2013
The Advocates submitted three reports to the UN Human Rights Committee before the Committee adopted a List of Issues for its upcoming review of the United States. The first report addresses the high level of domestic violence in the U.S. and identifies ways that the justice system could better address it. The second report identifies human rights violations arising out of death penalty practices in the U.S., including racial disparities and inhumane treatment. The third report examines deficiencies in the U.S. immigration system, including streamlined procedures, inadequate detention centers, and unwarranted detention of asylum seekers. For background information, click here.

19. A Practitioner’s Guide to Human Rights Monitoring, Documentation and Advocacy
This manual provides guidance on how to use a human rights framework to work for social change in the United States. The manual walks practitioners through every step in the human rights documentation process, from establishing the project and objectives to setting up the interviews to writing a report and making recommendations. Each section goes in-depth, posing questions and considerations to readers so they can best structure the process to suit their needs and resources. The manual also helps practitioners plan how to push forward recommendations using strategies from education and lobbying to litigation and international human rights mechanisms. Finally, the manual helps organizations understand how they can use human rights in their work for social change. The Advocates produced this manual at the request of the US Human Rights Network and with funding from the U.S. Human Rights Fund. ISBN: 0-929293-67-3

20. *Human Rights Committee - Rights of Non-citizens - Oct. 2012; Update to report
For background information, click here.

21. *Special Rapporteur – Detention of Migrants – Jan. 2012
At the request of the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Human Rights of Migrants, The Advocates compiled a submission outlining the detention of migrants in the United States, key systemic failures to protect their human rights, and priority recommendations. Collaborator: the National Network for Immigrant and Refugee Rights

22. *UPR - Cluster Report on Migrants Refugees and Asylum Seekers - November 2010
This cluster report, endorsed by nearly 100 nongovernmental organizations and individuals, outlines key failings of the U.S. immigration legal system to protect the human rights of migrants, refugees, and asylum seekers. Collaborator: U.S. Human Rights Network

23. *Human Rights Committee - Organizational Submission - November 2010
This report outlines the United States' compliance or failure to comply with various obligations under international human rights law. The report highlights failures to protect human rights in the context of the death penalty, the rights of women, and the rights of non-citizens.

24. *Inter-American Commission on Human Rights - Immigrant Detention - May 2010
This submission responds to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights' Questionnaire on Persons Deprived of Liberty in the Americas. Collaborators: Detention Watch Network and Amnesty International USA

25. Sex Trafficking Needs Assessment for the State of Minnesota (full report); Executive Summary (Originally published September 2008; revised edition October 2008)
Sex trafficking violates women and children’s basic human rights, including the right to be free from slavery and slavery-like practices; the right to equal protection under the law; the right to be free from discrimination based on race, nationality, and gender; and the rights to life, security of person and freedom from torture. Governments also violate trafficked persons’ rights when they fail to prevent sex trafficking, prosecute perpetrators or provide trafficked persons with effective remedies for these violations, such as access to courts and legal immigration status. At the request of the State of Minnesota’s Human Trafficking Task Force, The Advocates for Human Rights has prepared and published a needs assessment on sex trafficking in Minnesota.  The report examines the government response to this issue at the local, state, tribal and federal levels; identifies facilities and services currently available to trafficking victims in Minnesota; assesses their effectiveness; and makes recommendations for coordinating services to better meet the needs of sex trafficking victims statewide. ISBN: 0-929293-58-4

26. *CERD - Rights of Immigrants and Migrants - 2007
Immigrants in the United States are frequently discriminatorily denied their fundamental civil and political rights, as well as their economic, social and cultural rights. The United States, through direct and indirect actions, fails to meet its obligations under the Convention on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. Collaborators: (Multiple)


27. “Journey to Safety: The Battered Immigrant Woman’s Experience” – Video and Facilitator’s Guide (June 2007)
Published by The Advocates for Human Rights in partnership with Battered Women’s Justice Project and Pangea World Theater.  Supported by Grant No. 2004-WT-AX-K073 awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice. This set of training materials is designed to put participants in the shoes of an immigrant victim of domestic violence as she tries to negotiate the legal, medical and government systems.  The Journey to Safety video contains a 40-minute performance by Pangea World Theater, as well as three case studies and interviews with policemen, policymakers, prosecutors, judges, medical professionals, and other legal advocates.  The activities included in the Facilitator’s Guide are designed to complement the information presented in the performance and allow participants to 1) identify the barriers, 2) research and understand the complexity of the issues, and 3) develop strategies to address the problem.  The Facilitator’s Guide also provides a wide range of information and tools for professionals working with immigrant victims of domestic violence, such as fact sheets, referral lists, case studies, and domestic violence resources. ISBN: 978-0-929293-51-7

28. Voices from Silence (2007)
Details the impact of 9/11 on the lives of immigrants, refugees, and religious minorities in Minnesota, and documents personal stories of fear and discrimination in a post-9/11 environment and contextualizes them with an overview of laws and policies that have affected these communities. ISBN: 978-0-929293-51-6

29. *Human Rights Committee - Rights of Non-citizens - 2006|
This report addresses the United States' compliance with its obligations under the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights with regard to the rights of non-citizens. Collaborators: Multiple.

30. The Government Response to Domestic Violence Against Refugee and Immigrant Women in the Minneapolis/St. Paul Metropolitan Area: A Human Rights Report (Appendix AAppendix B and Appendix C) (Executive Summary)  (2004)
Documents domestic violence against refugee and immigrant women in the Minneapolis/St. Paul metropolitan area as a human rights violation in the United States. With this report, The Advocates highlights many of the innovative programs and legislative initiatives that advance the safety of battered refugee and immigrant women in our community and the prosecution of their abusers. The report finds that battered refugee and immigrant women in the Twin Cities area nevertheless face serious obstacles in accessing protection from domestic violence and government services, and in pursuing accountability for their abusers. These obstacles include language barriers and inadequate access to interpretation services; barriers from within immigrant communities that impede government effectiveness; fear of government institutions and immigration authorities; inadequate funding of necessary services and programs, and other obstacles in the law or implementation of the law. This report includes an analysis of governments’ compliance with their obligation to protect the human rights, safety and security of refugee and immigrant women who are victims of violence. ISBN: 0-929293 57-6

31. Global Child Survival: A Human Rights Priority: Case Studies of Uganda, Mexico, and U.S. (1999)
In developing and developed countries alike, more than 12 million children under the age of five die each year as a result of inadequate health services, violence, malnutrition, unsafe water, and lack of other basic necessities.  These deaths constitute an unspeakable tragedy and must be recognized as a gross violation of fundamental human rights.  This report tackles the serious issue of preventable child mortality and emphasizes that all rights -- civil, political, economic, social and cultural -- must be promoted and protected in order to ensure the health and survival of children. ISBN: 0-929293 38-x

32. Oakdale Detention Center: The First Year of Operation (1997)
Provides an account of the human rights conditions at the Oakdale Federal Alien Detention Center in Oakdale Louisiana, during its first year of operation. The improper, illegal and sometimes cruel treatment of the multinational alien detainees is documented and recommendations are given for a more humane approach to the problem of illegal immigration. ISBN: 0-929293 17-7

33. Hidden from View: Human Rights Conditions in the Krome Detention Center  (1991)
Examines the conditions of confinement and standards of operation of The Immigration and Naturalization Service's Krome Avenue Detention Center in South Dade County, Florida, a minimum security short term facility that houses detained aliens and has been the subject of serious allegations of due process and human rights abuses. ISBN: 0-929293 10-x

34. Energy of a Nation: Immigrants in America - A Teaching Guide for Grade 8 through Adult
This curriculum is a distinctive, comprehensive guide to teaching students about immigration in the United States. Designed for grade 8 through adult audiences, with a module for upper elementary and middle level students, this learning tool provides important fundamental concepts, as well as critical context to elevate students' basic understandings and expand their perspectives. Lesson plans include engaging activities, handouts, fact sheets, PowerPoints, and other materials. ISBN: 0-929293 54-1.  To order a print copy, complete an online order form. Cost: $35.

Uzbekistan
1. Domestic Violence in Uzbekistan (2000)
Documents domestic violence as a human rights violation in Uzbekistan. The report analyzes the Uzbek legal system, including the criminal justice system and family law. The report includes a discussion of the mahallah structure and how it relates to domestic violence as well as information on both the police and NGO response to domestic violence in Uzbekistan. The report also addresses Uzbekistan's obligations under international law. ISBN: 0-929293 48-7